yardie's reggae collection - thoughts


 

His foundation is in the holy mountains.
Jah loveth the gates of Zion more than all the dwellings of Jacob.
Glorious things are spoken of thee, O city of Jah. Selah
I will make mention of Rahab and Babylon to them that know I: behold Philistia, and Tyre, with Ethiopia: this man was born there.
And of Zion it shall be said, This and that man was born in her: and the highest himself shall establish her.
The Lord shall count, when he writeth up the people, that this man was born there. Selah
As well the singers as the players on instruments shall be there: all my springs are in thee.

Psalm 87 1-7
Jah Rastafari

 

I have always loved Reggae music. One of the first songs that I remember is "No Woman, No Cry". My father bought me the "Wailers" "Natty Dread" cassette and that present, which is now unfortunately lost, maybe got some sort of imprint in my ears. Even if this could sound a little bit too much nostalgic, this is really what happened. Growing up I got involved with every kind of sounds: from jazz (my father is responsible again) to rock. But I would say that Reggae was there waiting in the background. It came to light with "The Wailers" again. That time it was the "Live" set. In the mean time my ears were even more hungry for this music: Reggae.Here you will find basecally what I love: Roots Reggae. I am not such involved with other genres. I am starting to get involved in Dub. Dub should be a process of deconstruction with the final result of delivering something that is forceful enough to breath alone as a totally new musical entity. When that happens it is absolutley great Music. I am starting to get involved in DJ's and toasters since some of them are really great. I am not particularly interested in modern Dancehall which I see as a corruption of the "Foundation". I like "Concious Reggae" (and some early 90's "New Roots", as well) when is made by the real pure "young lions" that spread a true Rastafari belief. In any case I try to keep a full view over the 70's, which I think was the most rich era in the history of jamaican music. At least culturally speaking. Now I try to feed my ears and the result is shown here throughout my collection. Sometimes it happens that somebody asks me "Why do you love Reggae?" This is a tough question and an easy one too at the same time. Reggae music is enlightning. You know why? Because it can talk about struggle and sufferation and at the same time give you hope and strength. And this is what all of us need more than everything. The aim here is not to judge but only to express my thoughts. As an I-manbeing. Any comments are highly appreciated via email, but even more than that by the "Guestbook" link. This way your thoughts can be shared with other visitors. When you want to drop some lines please be patient because some times the page takes more than a few seconds to be uploaded. Many thanks.This is my growing collection and as stated at the end of the "Main List" page "we need peaceful comments, new ideas and thoughts to try to make things better". I add here that action is required too. Action that spreads a peaceful thought and way of living. How? Choose yours.Stop that raas claat anger. Avoid violence. Your enemies will die by themselfves not by your revenge.I hope that somebody who does not know what Raggae is can find some LIGHT here!Bless bredren and sistren, Selassie I Jah. Rastafari.

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